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Women Leaders: We Do NOT have More Time to be Silent

Women Leaders: We Do NOT have More Time to be Silent

Rachel Carson who wrote a book of major importance “The Silent Spring” was a GUTSY woman who spoke out about the level of toxins in our world 50 years ago. Those numbers are higher and the risk more deadly. Someone recently commented that with all the toxins in the world we are living longer so why worry. Interesting point of view. Do yourself a favor and get a copy of Carson’s book. It is as relevant, actually more so, than 5 decades ago. Please read the following blog and my response. And remember, those who remain silent are guilty too.   She Was Right By: Arianna Huffington (originally posted on www.huffingtonpost.com) Fifty years ago, a marine biologist named Rachel Carson began publishing a series of articles in The New Yorker, sounding the alarm about the dangers of exposure to chemicals and the failure of the chemical industry and government regulators to protect people from those dangers. Later collected in the book Silent Spring, Carson’s prescient insights are the subject of an anniversary feature this week by HuffPost’s environmental reporter Lynne Peeples. She delivers not only a tribute to Carson but a reminder that her work is more relevant than ever. Despite Carson’s warnings, our leaders are still not doing nearly enough to regulate the potentially harmful chemicals we’re exposed to every day. As Lynne notes, more than 80,000 chemicals currently used in our country have never been fully tested, so we don’t even know how damaging they might be to humans or to the environment. And as Harvard Medical School’s Eric Chivian explains, when it comes to determining if...
What do you do when you are ignored?

What do you do when you are ignored?

Did you ever sit in a restaurant and wonder if you had a snake on your head, or maybe a bird’s nest, or a mouse, or if your face had turned bright blue? You sit there and question why the server is taking so long to get to your table. It looks like everyone else is getting attention. Your meal drags on and on.  When you finally get your food, it is put in front of you with a grunt. You accept it with a groan. Some of us eat as fast as we can, get the check and get out, vowing never to enter the place again. Some of us chew every morsel and sit longer than usual just to see what, if anything will happen next. You question:  Should I leave a tip?  Do I seek out the manager? The way you handle poor service is a great indicator of the behavior patterns that you developed watching your parents maneuver through the courtesies and discomforts of going to the market, going to a clothing store, going to a restaurant, going just about anywhere. What do you do when people are discourteous? And on the other hand, how do you reward excellent service? Here is what happened at the eatery. I called the waitress aside and told her I thought she had been rude. I gave her an out by suggesting maybe she was unaware of it. What happened next was powerful. She took my hand and apologized. She told me she had just flunked a final exam and would have to go to summer school. She was...