(570) 636-3858 info@ceoptions.com
Women Leaders: We Do NOT have More Time to be Silent

Women Leaders: We Do NOT have More Time to be Silent

Rachel Carson who wrote a book of major importance “The Silent Spring” was a GUTSY woman who spoke out about the level of toxins in our world 50 years ago. Those numbers are higher and the risk more deadly. Someone recently commented that with all the toxins in the world we are living longer so why worry. Interesting point of view. Do yourself a favor and get a copy of Carson’s book. It is as relevant, actually more so, than 5 decades ago. Please read the following blog and my response. And remember, those who remain silent are guilty too.   She Was Right By: Arianna Huffington (originally posted on www.huffingtonpost.com) Fifty years ago, a marine biologist named Rachel Carson began publishing a series of articles in The New Yorker, sounding the alarm about the dangers of exposure to chemicals and the failure of the chemical industry and government regulators to protect people from those dangers. Later collected in the book Silent Spring, Carson’s prescient insights are the subject of an anniversary feature this week by HuffPost’s environmental reporter Lynne Peeples. She delivers not only a tribute to Carson but a reminder that her work is more relevant than ever. Despite Carson’s warnings, our leaders are still not doing nearly enough to regulate the potentially harmful chemicals we’re exposed to every day. As Lynne notes, more than 80,000 chemicals currently used in our country have never been fully tested, so we don’t even know how damaging they might be to humans or to the environment. And as Harvard Medical School’s Eric Chivian explains, when it comes to determining if...
GUTSY Women and Attachment Parenting

GUTSY Women and Attachment Parenting

Time magazine May issue started a major brouhaha that is hopefully the beginning of a great dialogue about what it means to be a parent and what children really want and need. For me, the photo of the mother and three year old son at his mother’s breast brought up the controversy from decades ago about nursing moms. I was a “thoroughly modern Millie” who, along with most of my peers, saw nursing as a primitive, overly emotional aspect of parenting. After all, formula was easy and healthy…. or so the marketing ads told us. Now most of us realize we were duped into the economics of the baby food industry. There is enough research that indicates breastfeeding is the truest, healthiest way for infants to get both nutrition and nurturing. The big question women are asking right now about attachment parenting is when is enough, enough? What are positive boundaries and what is best for the growth and development of our young? Here are two important books to review. One is by an old friend, Joseph Chilton Pearce, who wrote this in the 1970’s and is still an important source of information “Magical Child”. The other is fresh off the press and again, food for thought; “Bringing Up Bebe” by Pamela Druckerman. My own suggestion is to consider what really matters. How much do I.Q. scores really mean? How vital is it for kids to be on varsity sports teams? What do we do when children say they are bored? Where do computers fit into our lives and their lives? Working or staying at home, the issues are...

GUTSY Leadership: Butterflies in Your Belly

When I met Livia Genova-Pagano at an eWomen’s networking event in suburban Philadelphia I was struck by her strong and assured presence. I saw the word GUTSY written in the middle of her forehead. When we talked I saw how perfectly positioned she was for life to take her on a fast and fun ride to high level leadership. Her delight with her company was effervescent, she bubbled and sparkled. We talked about the key to being an entrepreneur, to being a GUTSY GAL. She talked about her belief that when you have an opportunity to do something, anything, and you feel butterflies flapping their wings in your tummy, you just need to stand up and get going! That’s what she did when she was a dietician for the Philadelphia school district. She had a really good job and lots of security. Yet, the call to adventure was just around the corner. She joined the Mary Kay organization for some extra money and to learn about the great products and never thinking would lead her to the world of pink Cadillacs. (Look for her in the Philadelphia area in the sharp pink car she zooms around in going from appointment to appointment) I was a ChapStick girl and never spent much time on my make-up” she stated looking amazing with her smooth skin, just done enough eyes and gorgeous red lips. “I decided to take that “silly lipstick thing” and in less than eight months I matched my dietician salary. Her suggestion to budding entrepreneurs is to “just jump in” rather than the slow and almost tortuous way of...

Can Bullying be Passive Aggressive?

She smiled sweetly and said she understood what was needed for the product in her territory to sell better. She wrote down what was said in the sales meeting. She had a list of places to call and people to meet. Yet nothing happened. Her boss had stomach aches and sleepless nights. He would fall asleep with the memory of that sweet smile and the promises of success. He was at an impasse. When he finally had THE MEETING, the one to tell her she was being let go, the room suddenly felt like an August day at the beach. He shed his wool sweater, even though the snow was still falling outside his window. He kept hearing the word “bully” in his mind. Who was the bully? He was responding in a kind yet direct manner. She was an under performer and it was costing the firm money. Finally, he heard the word out loud, from her mouth “You, Sir, are a bully and this is not the last of it. You will hear from me.” She turned and smiled that sweet smile. She had one hand on her hip, the other on the doorknob and said, “You have been out to get me for a long time and don’t think I haven’t been keeping records. You’ll see. Just you wait, you’ll see”. With that she slammed the door, hard. He sat at his desk feeling like he had been smacked across the face with a board embedded with nails. At that moment, he had a new definition of a bully; one who plays the game, never intending...

Workplace Conflict, Men, Women, and the Family

  Yesterday I talked about the tension at work where men are searching for ways to navigate that tough middle road between being a great employee or business owner and a father who is present for his children.   I saw this dilemma first hand at an off-site with a national sales group. Picture the scene: the team of 22 from a sales organization was at The Country Place Retreat Center to have some fun on our outdoors team challenge course and to take advantage of our new program called “Build and Give” where they would put some two wheeler bikes together that would then be donated to charity.   In the process they would learn about themselves, how the program “Ouch! Handling Conflict at Work” would help them talk together differently.   The women in the group came to me and requested time to put together a surprise skit for their male colleagues. They asked if I could “keep the guys busy” for about an hour while they pulled together their material.   I asked the men to gather to discuss their special issues with workplace conflict. They wanted to know why the gals were not included. Earlier, one of the men had said “NO one really understands our work-life balance issues” so, this was to give them time to think, feel and say whatever they wanted.   Off we went to the great room to sit in a circle and have time to “just talk“. Was I in for a surprise!   After just a few minutes they felt safe enough to dig deep. Here is the...

Leadership and The Velveteen Rabbit

  Anyone remember this really cool kids book? It came to mind yesterday when I was tired and felt “used up.” I complained to Herb, my husband with a litany of “blah blah blah, my hair, my face, wrinkles around my eyes, and more blah, blah, blah.”   He looked at me with his bemused smile and said “That’s all good, you are a velveteen rabbit, it’s what life is meant to be, to use us up before we exit this play called life.”   Not only did it not help, it made me madder. So, I did what any self respecting person would do, I look for some chocolate to sooth my troubled brow. Except, I’m on an amazing eating regime that is truly taking years and pounds from me; and there was no chocolate in sight.   So I got ready to use another ploy always in my back pocket; I would go shopping. And I did. I headed straight for the Barnes and Noble in town and got me a new copy of “The Velveteen Rabbit“.   I bought it, sat down with a cup of tea sweetened with the stevia I never leave home without (if you don’t know about stevia check it out; no calories, actually good for you and gives the taste buds a real lift).   The rabbit in this book is a stuffed and loved one that truly is used up, used up by the loving touch of its childhood owner. It should be on the reading list of every leadership development program, every executive education workshop. It made me stop...